Teachers present on new active assailant procedure “lockdown with options”

Students+look+on+as+English+teacher+Todd+Michaels+walks+the+class+through+possible+scenarios+under+the+new+active+assailant+policy.+All+teachers+gave+the+same+county-provided+presentation%2C+and+supplemented+it+with+hypotheticals+specific+to+their+classrooms.
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Teachers present on new active assailant procedure “lockdown with options”

Students look on as English teacher Todd Michaels walks the class through possible scenarios under the new active assailant policy. All teachers gave the same county-provided presentation, and supplemented it with hypotheticals specific to their classrooms.

Students look on as English teacher Todd Michaels walks the class through possible scenarios under the new active assailant policy. All teachers gave the same county-provided presentation, and supplemented it with hypotheticals specific to their classrooms.

Photo by Rebecca Hirsh.

Students look on as English teacher Todd Michaels walks the class through possible scenarios under the new active assailant policy. All teachers gave the same county-provided presentation, and supplemented it with hypotheticals specific to their classrooms.

Photo by Rebecca Hirsh.

Photo by Rebecca Hirsh.

Students look on as English teacher Todd Michaels walks the class through possible scenarios under the new active assailant policy. All teachers gave the same county-provided presentation, and supplemented it with hypotheticals specific to their classrooms.

By Matthew Proestel

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Teachers gave a presentation to their second period classes Dec. 11 outlining what students and staff should do in the event of an armed assailant entering the building.

The presentation, provided by the county, explained the new “lockdown with options” procedure. Teachers discussed different measures that students could take to protect themselves in various situations, including barricading themselves in their classrooms, defending themselves against the assailant and fleeing the school until it’s safe to return. Teachers and students also reviewed hypothetical scenarios specific to their classroom’s location.

This was the first time students were informed of this new procedure. Students could submit feedback to the county, who will address them and amend the presentation as needed. The administration received half a dozen to a dozen questions from students, according to principal Robert Dodd.

Dodd felt the presentation addressed an important issue and hoped it helped comfort people concerned in the wake of recent mass shootings.

“I have not received extensive feedback yet, but my team leaders had positive responses about the training and that it was not too unnerving while addressing an important issue,” Dodd said. “The presentations created great conversations and generated important questions, like is there a back up PA system.”

Sophomore Sophie Monroe felt the drill was thorough and reassured her that there was a plan in place.

“It was kind of scary to think about, but I thought they did a good job addressing the possibility that it might happen and they told students what to do if the situation did occur,” she said.

Teachers also felt better after the presentation.

“I found it kind of strangely reassuring if the unthinkable happens,” English teacher Todd Michaels said. “It’s nice to see that there is a plan in place.”

 

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