The Black and White

Whitman should offer an AP Capstone course

Whitman should offer an AP Capstone course

By Sam Mulford

February 20, 2020

Jess Berman, a junior at Hall High School in West Hartford, Connecticut, has always had an interest in health and nutrition. After learning that the Mediterranean diet — a diet that emphasizes eating vegetables, fruits, whole grains and nuts — is linked to increased mental processes, Berman wanted t...

Staff editorial: Give OneWhitman a chance

Staff editorial: Give OneWhitman a chance

February 19, 2020

OneWhitman, a new initiative this year intended to encourage inclusion, celebrating diversity and togetherness in the Whitman community, has gotten off to a rough start. The student body does have more than one holistic opinion about OneWhitman — but most of the feedback is negative. Instead of fos...

Nineties sitcoms are outdated — that’s no reason to “cancel” them

Nineties sitcoms are outdated — that’s no reason to “cancel” them

By Holly Adams

February 13, 2020

Whether I’m complimenting someone’s Rachel Green-esque outfit or giving my friends Ron Swanson life advice to fix their problems, I constantly reference sitcoms in my daily conversations. Sometimes, my friends don’t understand my references, but since Netflix added “Friends” to its lengthy...

New Montgomery County Equity Bill isn’t sufficient

New Montgomery County Equity Bill isn’t sufficient

By Ben Waldman

February 12, 2020

The Montgomery County Council passed the Racial Equity and Social Justice Act Nov. 19, 2019 in an effort to reduce county-wide inequality.  The bill mandates the creation of an Office of Racial Equity and Social Justice in the county’s executive branch, which will submit an “impact statement...

Power to the people: don’t overlook local politics

Power to the people: don’t overlook local politics

By Jocie Mintz

February 11, 2020

When I was writing an article about an environmental town hall, I knew I’d have to sit through three hours of political schmooze between the old people in local government. I headed to the town hall ready to endure monotony and boredom for the sake of journalism. But as I sat through the meeting, I b...

I used to want cable. Now? Not so much.

I used to want cable. Now? Not so much.

By James Marzolf

February 9, 2020

When I was younger, Fridays were special for me; my friends and I would bring our beyblades — those spinny, metal tops that can cut your fingers if you’re not careful — and battle each other near the playground’s classic yellow slide in front of our elementary school in College Park. Every...

The lasting impact of the Armenian Genocide

The lasting impact of the Armenian Genocide

By Jack McGuire

February 6, 2020

For most of my life, I saw my Armenian background as a trivial part of my family history. My family and I often joked about how our very white family technically originated from Asia, and we loosely connected ourselves to celebrities with Armenian origins like the Kardashians, Cher and Food Network Chef Geof...

Journalism requires sensitivity in tragic events

Journalism requires sensitivity in tragic events

By Jesse Rider

February 4, 2020

Just like they do dozens of other times every day, people around the world checked their phones Jan. 26 at 2:32 pm. But what they saw this time was different: a notification from TMZ with the headline, “BREAKING: Kobe Bryant Has Died In A Helicopter Crash.” TMZ was the first media outlet to break the ...

52 years after “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” aired, we still remember its message

52 years after “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” aired, we still remember its message

By Eleanor Taylor

February 3, 2020

When I was little, lunch at my grandma’s house was nearly always the same: the smell of pasta cooking on her gas stove, the glowing screen of her 10-by-10 inch antenna TV and Mister Rogers’ timeless query: “Won’t you be my neighbor?” “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” first aired in 1968, so whil...

High school books, ranked

High school books, ranked

By Jesse Rider

January 23, 2020

It’s no secret that many high school students find reading to be a nuisance, but when teachers force them to read a book, that nuisance turns into an outright dislike for reading. Even if it’s a good book, forced reading becomes a burden on top of other homework and extracurriculars. Nonetheless, r...

A viking in France

A viking in France

By Audrey Feledy

January 22, 2020

When I stepped off of the plane on September 4, I couldn’t believe where I was. After all those months of telling people I would be living in France for a year, I was finally here — albeit in the airport, but it still counted. The program I chose to attend is called School Year Abroad. I’d been...

Christmas is more than just a holiday

Christmas is more than just a holiday

By Matt Mande

December 24, 2019

I’m Jewish. I’ve spent countless hours in Hebrew school, and countless more at three-hour long holiday services. I’ve read from the Torah and Haftorah, I’ve had a Bar Mitzvah and I’ve attended the Bar and Bat Mitzvahs of my peers and family, muttering prayers under my breath at services whi...