The Black & White

Maryland, end the drunk-driving epidemic: pass Noah’s Law

Maryland, end the drunk-driving epidemic: pass Noah’s Law

By Editorial Board

April 8, 2016


Filed under Editorials, Opinion

Officer Noah Leotta had a bright future, but everything changed the night of Dec. 3, his father Rich Leotta said. “No more laughs, no more walks, no more talks, no more future.” Read More »...

Her mind is more important than her body

Her mind is more important than her body

By Celia Hoffman

March 22, 2016


Filed under Opinion

In the last five minutes of lunch at Pyle on March 9, assistant principal Scott Gitchell picked up the microphone and started dismissing the students to go to their lockers to put away their lunchboxes and head to class, just like any day. But this Wednesday, Gitchell told all of the girls to remain...

County made wrong call in extending third quarter

By Naomi Ravick

March 22, 2016


Filed under Opinion

The break between first and second semester is the perfect second winter break: there’s little to no work to be done and binge-watching Netflix has virtually no repercussions. Read More »...

Thank you, Ms. Reynolds

Thank you, Ms. Reynolds

By Caleb Friedman

March 16, 2016


Filed under News, Opinion

For those of you who don’t know, the Black & White’s teacher advisor, Louise Reynolds, is stepping down from the post after this issue. She will return to teaching Journalism 1 next year, in addition to her English classes. The current Journalism teacher, Nick Confino, will become the paper's new...

It’s bracket season: the best event in sports is back

It’s bracket season: the best event in sports is back

By Caleb Friedman

March 13, 2016


Filed under Opinion, Sports

What if I told you one three-week event combined sheer elation, utter heartbreak and extreme unpredictability. Read More »...

Why you should vote

By Jason Grill

March 10, 2016


Filed under Blogs, Opinion

November 8th, 1998. Anybody born before that date is eligible to (and should) vote in both the primary and general presidential elections. Voting isn’t just a right guaranteed by the constitution, but it’s also citizens’ responsibility to ensure an effective, representative government. Read More »...

New Barbies are too little, too late

By Natachi Onwuamaegbu

March 2, 2016


Filed under Blogs, Opinion

For my fifth birthday, I received a four-foot-tall Barbie doll house. It was a bright pink wooden eyesore that housed over 50 dolls. I had princess Barbies, pilot Barbies and even astronaut Barbies. They had different costumes, play houses and accessories, but they all had one thing in common: they were...

Where US democracy falls behind

Where US democracy falls behind

By Tanusha Mishra

February 24, 2016


Filed under Opinion

  The U.S. ranks 74th in gender-based wage equality among 145 countries according to the latest Global Gender Gap Report, the World Economic Forum’s comprehensive ranking of countries according to overall gender equality. Read More »...

Why are we so afraid to speak our minds?

Why are we so afraid to speak our minds?

By Naomi Ravick

February 22, 2016


Filed under Blogs, Opinion

Glossophobia–the fear of public speaking–is the 13th most common fear in the world. For students, getting in front of a class to speak one’s thoughts can often be somewhat scary. Read More »...

I stand with Beyoncé, and you should too

By Jennah Haque

February 15, 2016


Filed under Blogs, Opinion

Queen Bey has always had a special place in our hearts and on our playlists. With 20 Grammys and a net worth of $450 million, the iconic pop star will go down in history as one of the best artists of our generation. Read More »...

Vikes take the plunge at Cool School Challenge

By Sophia Knappertz

February 11, 2016


Filed under Blogs, Opinion

Full of high spirits and high anxiety, 24 Viking Plungers headed to Sandy Point State Park to drink some hot chocolate and dive into 40-degree water. Read More »...

It’s time to give college athletes the pay they deserve

By Caleb Friedman

February 10, 2016


Filed under Blogs, Opinion

In my eyes, college football boosters and athletics directors run their programs like sweatshops—they exploit young men and women. The very athletes who earn millions upon millions of dollars for these boosters and programs aren’t compensated for their work. Read More »...