43rd annual Glen Echo Labor Day Arts Show brings variety, original work

By Julia Pearl-Schwartz

For those unable to drive three hours to the beach this Labor Day weekend, the 43rd Annual Labor Day Art Show at Glen Echo Park proved to be a local option that was just as relaxing.

The show, held in the Spanish Ballroom, featured work from over 250 artists including pottery, paintings, glass, photography, sculptures and more. Admission was free and most displayed pieces were for sale.

The large assortment of work is primarily due to the fact that the show is non-juried, meaning that all art is accepted. There is a $25 fee to apply online, and as long as the show has not filled up, artists are guaranteed a spot to display their work.

A wide variety of art was displayed at the Glen Echo Arts Festival this weekend. Photo by Julia-Pearl-Schwartz.
A wide variety of art was displayed at the Glen Echo Arts Festival this weekend. Photo by Julia-Pearl-Schwartz.

“The goal is to engage the community in a non-juried show,” Labor Day Art Show assistant Jaimianne Amicucci said. “And also to show the talent of regional artists to the public.”

Nancy Long, 84, has worked on the show since its inception. She arranges the work by sorting it by color and form, and hangs similar pieces together on the same display boards.

She says she enjoys being surprised by the different art displayed each year.

“I like to see the great variety of artistic expression that comes forward in this kind of show,” Long said. “It’s a very satisfying experience for me to see people relating to what has been brought in.”

Jean Doyle, 36, a long-time fan of art at Glen Echo, said she appreciates the wide range of style that the show brings.

Robin Roome, an artist and volunteer at the exhibition, contributed a painting entitled “An Athena” to the festival. Photo by Julia Pearl-Schwartz.
Robin Roome, an artist and volunteer at the exhibition, contributed a painting entitled “An Athena” to the festival. Photo by Julia Pearl-Schwartz.

“I love that there’s a lot of different types of art you can look at,” Doyle said. “It’s really an eclectic mix and I think there’s something for everyone here.”

Robin Roome, an artist and volunteer at the exhibition, contributed a painting entitled “An Athena,” to the mix. The piece depicted a green statue of an elegant woman wrapped in cloth.

Even though she doesn’t know what prospective purchasers might buy, Roome still likes to show her work, she said.

“You just have to do what you feel,” she said. “To find joy in that is very rewarding.”