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  • The Shakespeare Club's performance of "Julius Caesar" will be on April 29 and 30 at 7:00 p.m. in the WAUD. Admission is $5.

  • Festival of the Arts is April 26 and 27 from 6-9 p.m.

  • Come to A234 on April 26 during lunch for a presentation on immigration and refugee settlement. Pizza will be served.

  • The media center will be closed before and during school April 26 for SMOB voting.

  • See Ms. Safran in B311 if you're interested in becoming Whitman's liaison to the Montgomery County Regional SGA.

  • Whitman Idol is April 25 at 7 p.m. in the auditorium. Admission is $5.

  • Anyone interested in auditioning as a speaker at graduation should come to A212 on April 27 after school.

  • Tickets for prom are being sold starting April 24 at $45 per person.

  • The Science Club will be hosting interactive discussions and presentations on April 25. Come to Room C326 after school.

  • Dogs will be visiting Whitman on April 21. Stop by the small gym during both lunch periods.

New supreme court nominee generates varying student responses

Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch is the second recent Supreme Court nominee with ties to Montgomery County. Photo courtesy 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch is the second recent Supreme Court nominee with ties to Montgomery County. Photo courtesy 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

By Lily Jacobson

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Students had a wide range of reactions to President Trump’s recent nomination of Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court Jan. 31. His nomination marks the second straight Supreme Court nominee with significant connections to Montgomery County after President Obama’s nominee, Bethesda resident Merrick Garland.

Gorsuch is originally from Denver, but moved to Washington in 1981 and graduated from Georgetown Prep (‘95). Gorsuch then graduated from Columbia and Harvard Law School. His judicial career began in 2006 when he was appointed to Denver’s 10th Circuit Court of Appeals by President Bush.

Gorsuch is ideologically similar to the late jurist Justice Scalia, according to a Jan. 28 article in the New York Times. He is an originalist, meaning he interprets the constitution based on what the founders intended at the time it was written.

Some students expressed concern regarding Gorsuch’s conservative nature.

“I am not very happy about the nomination, but I am not surprised since Trump promised a conservative judge,” sophomore Eric Neugeboren said. “At least he has experience, and hopefully the justices can work together and help our country for the better.”

Not all students had a negative response. Some students are eagerly awaiting his potential confirmation by the Senate.

“I am happy because this will enable the Supreme Court to once again be at full strength and address the many legal issues facing our nation today,” junior Clark Boinis said.

AP NSL teacher Colin O’Brien said he believes Gorsuch will be confirmed and is interested to see how the Supreme Court will rule on Trump’s immigration order.

O’Brien also mentioned Gorsuch’s private comments in a meeting with Senator Richard Blumenthal condemning President Trump’s delegitimization of the federal judge who halted the travel ban. While Gorsuch’s comments remain unconfirmed, O’Brien is interested in seeing how they may affect him in his confirmation hearing set for March.

“Conservatives generally support Gorsuch’s views and political philosophy,” O’Brien said, “Liberals will take heart knowing that Gorsuch wants to protect judicial independence from a president who might threaten our separation of powers.”

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The Student News Site of Walt Whitman High School
New supreme court nominee generates varying student responses